Civil War in America

The Civil war occured from 1861 to 1865 and was fought over slavery, racism, and taxes. Since Texas outlawed abortion this month, the words Civil War have been spoken again by the masses. According to Debate.org 88% of people in America believe we are headed for a civil war within the next five to ten years. Many of the people who said they believe the U.S. is headed for civil war give reasons such as immigration issues, gun control, lack of employment and taxes. Most of the people who agree all have the same general consensus, the government has become overbearing and is attempting to take citizens constitutional rights. If you would like a reminder of the rights we have and what they mean, check out our “We The People: The Rights of Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow” series. Could America be headed for another Civil War? Has Texas started the ball rolling towards conflict?

How Has Texas Affected States’ Relationships?

Texas has been the most recent reason the masses are calling for Civil war. Many states have responded in negative ways. The city of Portland, Oregon, announced it intends to ban trade and travel to the state of Texas in response to the Lone Star State’s new abortion law. Mayor Ted Wheeler announced the city council intends to vote on an emergency resolution to stop “the City’s future procurement of goods and services from, and City employee business travel to, the state of Texas.” The resolution will be in effect until Texas ends the law or it is overturned. “The Portland City Council stands unified in its belief that all people should have the right to choose if and when they carry a pregnancy and that the decisions they make are complex, difficult, and unique to their circumstances.” In a statement, Governor Gavin Newsom said he will continue to make sure women in California have access to abortion services. “I am outraged that the U.S. Supreme Court has allowed Texas’ ban on most abortions to take effect. Silently, in the dead of night, the Supreme Court has eviscerated the fundamental protection of a woman’s right to choose that Roe v. Wade has protected for the last 50 years. In California, we will ensure that women continue to have access to critical health care services, including abortion, and California will continue to lead the nation in expanding access to reproductive and sexual health care. And I will continue to appoint judges and justices who will faithfully follow the Constitution and precedent to uphold people’s rights, unlike this disappointing inaction from the high court.”

texas vs portland

“The first and most urgent message I have for Texas patients, Texas providers, and all those who will be impacted by this draconian law is this: We stand with you, and we are here for you,” said Vicki Cowart, President & CEO of Planned Parenthood of the Colorado Rocky Mountains, in a press statement. “Here in the Rocky Mountain region, our health center doors are open to anyone who seeks high-quality, compassionate health care, no matter where they live.” Wether you are Conservative or Liberal, you have the right to choose what you want to do with your body from wearing a mask and getting vaccinated to having an abortion before the pregnancy is considered viable. Texas has taken the right to choose what women can and can’t do with their own bodies. Will the new abortion law be the straw that breaks the camels back? Boston University historian, Nina Sibler, says the political climate of today and “The inability to find a political middle ground, certainly in the federal government, seems to be similar” to the political climate before the first Civil War in America. How do Civil wars generally begin? Are those conditions mirrored in today’s American Society?

How do Civil wars begin? 

According to the Encyclopedia Britannica, Civil war is a violent conflict between a state and one or more organized non-state actors in the state’s territory. Civil wars are distinguished from interstate conflicts, violent conflicts/riots, and state repression against individuals who cannot be considered an organized or cohesive group, including genocides and terrorism. Civil wars often last for years, are not usually settled by formal agreements, and are likely to recur within the society. Britannica says most civil wars take place in poorer societies and societies who are broken by political divide and conflict. The American political scientist Ted Gurr highlighted inequality and how groups may resort to rebellion if they are dissatisfied with their current economic status. Unemployment is at an all time high, more and more people unable to afford to live, and jobs being harder and harder to find. Could America be shifting towards a poorer society? Political deprivation, such as lack of political rights is another reason for resorting to Civil war. Texas has taken away their citizens rights and other states are rumored to have plans to follow Texas’ lead. Finally, civil wars are often closely linked to interstate war. Poor relations between states could create an atmosphere where violent conflict is believed to be needed. Already we are seeing certains speak out against Texas and even completely cutting Texas off. These conditions lead us to the ultimate question… Are the conditions right for a Civil war?

oregon barrs texas trade

In America we have MANY of the factors present that lead to civil war. We have had a past civil war. Our first civil war ended but never truly resolved the core of the issues that were fought over. Once the conflict stopped the government essentially swept everything under the rug and forgot about it. Now, we have had major political unrest within the last year. States who are supposed to be united are fighting amongst themselves, some states are trying to take the rights of their citizens, we have high rates of poverty and unemployment, and our political divides get deeper and wider by the day. The conditions seem right for a Civil war within the next 10 years. Will we eventually go to war with each other… or will we find a way to once again be the UNITED states?

Written by: Erinn Malloy

Social sharing: